Lily lives in Arlington, Virginia. Lily’s owner is Heidi Laplace, and Lily’s walker is Eleanor. At Waggy Walkys we love our client’s and their owner’s. 🙂

#Lily #Arlington #Virginia #dmv #waggywalkys #dogwalkers #doglovers #dogwalking #dc #maryland #virginia #dmvarea #dogwalkingdc #dogwalkingmd #dogwalkingva #petsitting #walk #dog #dogsofinstagram #pet #petstagram #animal #animalsofinstagram #beautifuldog #

We know we can never take your place in the loving eyes of your pet – but we sure as heck can serve as an awesome fill-in when you’re at work, too busy or away on vacation. Waggy Walkys has been catering to pets of all shapes, sizes and breeds since 2002, growing a trusted network of pet care professionals throughout the DC, Maryland and Virginia area.

It’s not just what we do that sets us apart – it’s how we do it. Your pet’s health and safety are our main priorities, with extensive training, vetting and background checks provided for all pet care professionals in our network. Most of our trusted dog walkers and pet sitters have cared for animals for much of their lives, ensuring they have the know-how and skills to properly tend to the needs of your pet.

When you entrust your pet with Waggy Walkys, you enjoy daily updates, detailed reports and, best of all, peace of mind that your pet is being cared for with the compassion, attention and adoration he deserves. Our second priority? Having tons of fun, of course! Give us a ring today.

Our services cover all kinds of stuff you and your pet would need help with, from dog walks to family-style boarding, overnight house sitting visits to daily pet sitting visits (morning, afternoon, evening) for dogs, cats and any other pets you may have! We even offer a pet taxi to transport your pet to appointments or to and from your designated dog boarding house. Need something extra special? We gladly customize our services to meet you and your pet’s exact needs. Contact us now to learn more.

Waggy Walkys LLC is a professional Dog Walking and Pet Care company that has been in business since 2002. We pride ourselves on pet safety, thoroughly screened staff, and excellent customer service. Please contact us today for our current promotions!

Gromit lives in D.C., Washington, DC. Gromit’s owner is Ryan Michigan, and Gromit’s walker is Eleanor. At Waggy Walkys we love our client’s and their owner’s. 🙂

#Gromit #D.C. #Washington, DC #dmv #waggywalkys #dogwalkers #doglovers #dogwalking #dc #maryland #virginia #dmvarea #dogwalkingdc #dogwalkingmd #dogwalkingva #petsitting #walk #dog #dogsofinstagram #pet #petstagram #animal #animalsofinstagram #beautifuldog #

We know we can never take your place in the loving eyes of your pet – but we sure as heck can serve as an awesome fill-in when you’re at work, too busy or away on vacation. Waggy Walkys has been catering to pets of all shapes, sizes and breeds since 2002, growing a trusted network of pet care professionals throughout the DC, Maryland and Virginia area.

It’s not just what we do that sets us apart – it’s how we do it. Your pet’s health and safety are our main priorities, with extensive training, vetting and background checks provided for all pet care professionals in our network. Most of our trusted dog walkers and pet sitters have cared for animals for much of their lives, ensuring they have the know-how and skills to properly tend to the needs of your pet.

When you entrust your pet with Waggy Walkys, you enjoy daily updates, detailed reports and, best of all, peace of mind that your pet is being cared for with the compassion, attention and adoration he deserves. Our second priority? Having tons of fun, of course! Give us a ring today.

Our services cover all kinds of stuff you and your pet would need help with, from dog walks to family-style boarding, overnight house sitting visits to daily pet sitting visits (morning, afternoon, evening) for dogs, cats and any other pets you may have! We even offer a pet taxi to transport your pet to appointments or to and from your designated dog boarding house. Need something extra special? We gladly customize our services to meet you and your pet’s exact needs. Contact us now to learn more.

Waggy Walkys LLC is a professional Dog Walking and Pet Care company that has been in business since 2002. We pride ourselves on pet safety, thoroughly screened staff, and excellent customer service. Please contact us today for our current promotions!

Wallace/Grommit lives in Rockville, Maryland. Wallace/Grommit’s owner is Julie Rovner, and Wallace/Grommit’s walker is Hayley. At Waggy Walkys we love our client’s and their owner’s. 🙂

#Wallace/Grommit #Rockville #Maryland #dmv #waggywalkys #dogwalkers #doglovers #dogwalking #dc #maryland #virginia #dmvarea #dogwalkingdc #dogwalkingmd #dogwalkingva #petsitting #walk #dog #dogsofinstagram #pet #petstagram #animal #animalsofinstagram #beautifuldog #

We know we can never take your place in the loving eyes of your pet – but we sure as heck can serve as an awesome fill-in when you’re at work, too busy or away on vacation. Waggy Walkys has been catering to pets of all shapes, sizes and breeds since 2002, growing a trusted network of pet care professionals throughout the DC, Maryland and Virginia area.

It’s not just what we do that sets us apart – it’s how we do it. Your pet’s health and safety are our main priorities, with extensive training, vetting and background checks provided for all pet care professionals in our network. Most of our trusted dog walkers and pet sitters have cared for animals for much of their lives, ensuring they have the know-how and skills to properly tend to the needs of your pet.

When you entrust your pet with Waggy Walkys, you enjoy daily updates, detailed reports and, best of all, peace of mind that your pet is being cared for with the compassion, attention and adoration he deserves. Our second priority? Having tons of fun, of course! Give us a ring today.

Our services cover all kinds of stuff you and your pet would need help with, from dog walks to family-style boarding, overnight house sitting visits to daily pet sitting visits (morning, afternoon, evening) for dogs, cats and any other pets you may have! We even offer a pet taxi to transport your pet to appointments or to and from your designated dog boarding house. Need something extra special? We gladly customize our services to meet you and your pet’s exact needs. Contact us now to learn more.

Waggy Walkys LLC is a professional Dog Walking and Pet Care company that has been in business since 2002. We pride ourselves on pet safety, thoroughly screened staff, and excellent customer service. Please contact us today for our current promotions!

Feliway is a safe, effective and natural way to improve problem behavior and help your cat to cope with changes such as moving house and introducing new pets.

What is Feliway?

Cats are very susceptible to pheromones, let’s face it they use them all the time to make their environment smell more cat-friendly. Every time your cat scratches on something, rubs his face somewhere or urinates to mark, he is using his ‘smell brain’ to map out his home.

In many cases where cats become unhappy or hard to live with, they are simply working out strategies to cope with the constantly changing environment they live in. Situations that are often out of their control and cause them to act in often peculiar ways. Changes such as a new baby, routine changes, a house move, new furniture and other cats can be severely distressing. Some cats, like people internalise their anxieties, while others will wear their hearts on their paws and tell you all about how they feel.

Feliway comes as a plug-in diffuser with a replaceable refill or a non-aerosol hand-held spray. The diffuser constantly releases a pheromone that can’t be detected by our human noses, but that is comforting to cats. It works in a similar way to an air freshener and simply plugs into a regular power socket.

The hand-held spray is useful to treat specific places such as a cat carrier or areas your cat is urine marking or scratching.

How does Feliway work?

Feliway makes your home, that dreaded cat carrier or your new house smell comforting and safe. It is formulated from an analogue of the feline facial pheromone, which cats place on things by rubbing their faces on furniture (or people!).

Cats are not particularly good at change. They like routine and predictability. Unfortunately life is not always like this. Situations that are often out of your cat’s control can often cause anxiety, leading to behavioural problems. Your cat may scratch on furniture, urinate somewhere, vocalise, be reluctant to eat, overgroom or simply go and hide to avoid everything. Feliway is one way to get your cat out from under the bed and feeling a little happier again.

When should you use Feliway?

Stressed cats may overgroom, yowl, pace, urinate outside of the litter tray, show aggression, hide more often, may overeat or lose their appetite or under-eat. They may also lose the ability to play or may be unable to get their regular 16-18 hours of sleep a day.

We suggest placing the Feliway Diffuser Set in a power point in the main part of your house, or where your cat spends most of his time. If you are moving, place the diffuser in the new house 24 hours before you move your cat in. It would be ideal to have a separate room for your cat to feel safe in when you first move in, with the Feliway plugged in.

For trips to the vet, spray Feliway Spray into the cat carrier just before travel.

For urine marking, after cleaning with a enzymatic cleaner, spray Feliway in that particular spot to deter repeated ‘accidents’. For more information on solving problems involving cats urinating outside of the litter tray, visit here.

What to look for when buying Feliway

For travel or urine marking where a hand-held spray would be useful, look to buy the Feliway Spray that you can spray onto areas your cat marks with urine or in the cat carrier.

For anxious cats, moving home or situations where you are introducing a new pet or human to the household, the diffuser would be more useful.

Simply check that the tamper seal is in place when you purchase your Feliway.

Where can you buy Feliway?

Feliway is available in online stores such as Amazonor vet clinics.

What else do I need?

If your cat is suffering from anxiety, consider also the Thundershirtfor cats.

The post Feliway for Cats: A Pet Parent’s Guide appeared first on Love That Pet.

Feliway is a safe, effective and natural way to improve problem behavior and help your cat to cope with changes such as moving house and introducing new pets.

What is Feliway?

Cats are very susceptible to pheromones, let’s face it they use them all the time to make their environment smell more cat-friendly. Every time your cat scratches on something, rubs his face somewhere or urinates to mark, he is using his ‘smell brain’ to map out his home.

In many cases where cats become unhappy or hard to live with, they are simply working out strategies to cope with the constantly changing environment they live in. Situations that are often out of their control and cause them to act in often peculiar ways. Changes such as a new baby, routine changes, a house move, new furniture and other cats can be severely distressing. Some cats, like people internalise their anxieties, while others will wear their hearts on their paws and tell you all about how they feel.

Feliway comes as a plug-in diffuser with a replaceable refill or a non-aerosol hand-held spray. The diffuser constantly releases a pheromone that can’t be detected by our human noses, but that is comforting to cats. It works in a similar way to an air freshener and simply plugs into a regular power socket.

The hand-held spray is useful to treat specific places such as a cat carrier or areas your cat is urine marking or scratching.

How does Feliway work?

Feliway makes your home, that dreaded cat carrier or your new house smell comforting and safe. It is formulated from an analogue of the feline facial pheromone, which cats place on things by rubbing their faces on furniture (or people!).

Cats are not particularly good at change. They like routine and predictability. Unfortunately life is not always like this. Situations that are often out of your cat’s control can often cause anxiety, leading to behavioural problems. Your cat may scratch on furniture, urinate somewhere, vocalise, be reluctant to eat, overgroom or simply go and hide to avoid everything. Feliway is one way to get your cat out from under the bed and feeling a little happier again.

When should you use Feliway?

Stressed cats may overgroom, yowl, pace, urinate outside of the litter tray, show aggression, hide more often, may overeat or lose their appetite or under-eat. They may also lose the ability to play or may be unable to get their regular 16-18 hours of sleep a day.

We suggest placing the Feliway Diffuser Set in a power point in the main part of your house, or where your cat spends most of his time. If you are moving, place the diffuser in the new house 24 hours before you move your cat in. It would be ideal to have a separate room for your cat to feel safe in when you first move in, with the Feliway plugged in.

For trips to the vet, spray Feliway Spray into the cat carrier just before travel.

For urine marking, after cleaning with a enzymatic cleaner, spray Feliway in that particular spot to deter repeated ‘accidents’. For more information on solving problems involving cats urinating outside of the litter tray, visit here.

What to look for when buying Feliway

For travel or urine marking where a hand-held spray would be useful, look to buy the Feliway Spray that you can spray onto areas your cat marks with urine or in the cat carrier.

For anxious cats, moving home or situations where you are introducing a new pet or human to the household, the diffuser would be more useful.

Simply check that the tamper seal is in place when you purchase your Feliway.

Where can you buy Feliway?

Feliway is available in online stores such as Amazonor vet clinics.

What else do I need?

If your cat is suffering from anxiety, consider also the Thundershirtfor cats.

The post Feliway for Cats: A Pet Parent’s Guide appeared first on Love That Pet.

Buying toys for your pets is like buying toys for your toddler. You need to watch for dangers in every toy, no matter how harmless it looks to ensure your pet’s safety.

Catnip and honeysuckle-stuffed plushies are among the most common and popular toys for cats, and what dog doesn’t enjoy tearing apart a stuffed squirrel or old slipper? Ferrets like to pretend to hunt down stuffed animals three times their size, and conures love to have a “lovie” to snuggle with.

All these soft toys seem harmless enough. After all, what can a plush toy do? However, even the safest-looking toy might harbour a risk to your pet’s health and safety. As a responsible pet-owner, it’s your job to make sure your pet’s toys are safe, just as you would check every toy for a small child.

Pointy Parts

Cats and ferrets like to chase soft toys that dangle on a string which, itself, dangles from a stick. The contraption looks like a fishing rod. These types of toys are great to play with when you’re there controlling the stick, but they are not good for unsupervised play as the pointy ends represent a very real risk to your pets eyes, mouth and body.

Strings

Then, there’s the string on that dangly toy. Balls of wool and toy mice with long tails also have long, stringy parts. These run the risk of strangling or choking your pet. Worse, if a string is swallowed, it can cut open your cat’s intestines. This is a medical emergency that represents a real risk your pet’s life and, should it occur, will require a visit to your nearest emergency veterinary clinic.

Tinsel and fake “icicle” drapey, like those you find on Christmas trees, are also dangerous to your pets. So is the cellophane grass that is sold to line Easter baskets.

Small Parts

Another choking risk comes in the form of small eyes and noses on soft toys. Quite often, these are glued onto the toy, and it takes very little time for Misty or Fluffy to get them off. Sometimes, these pieces are simply lost. Other times, they are swallowed or inhaled. Tiny felt bits are less likely to be an issue than the plastic pieces. The plastic can break apart, leaving sharp edges which can cut tummies.

If toys need faces, safe paints are the best bet. Sturdy embroidery is the next best choice.

Paints and Dyes

If you’ve been paying attention to the news over the past few years, you’ve probably heard about recalls of children’s toys because of lead, cadmium, cobalt, and mercury in the paints used to decorate them. This is actually a larger problem in children’s toys than it pet toys, but you still need to be watchful. If there are painted designs on a dog’s soft-rubber chew-toy, that paint is going to come off and end up in your dog. Choose an unpainted chewy.

The main issue with pet toys and paint will show up when you are shopping for parrot toys. The safest choice is to stick to food-grade dyes for any parrot toy that is painted.

Stuffing

Over the past few years, the companies that make pet toys have started offering un-stuffed plushies for dogs. As a tug-of-war toy, this is perfect. Fido can rip and tear to his heart’s content, and you don’t need to worry about him accidentally swallowing the stuffing.

Stuffing can be made of any of several substances: cotton, kapok, polyester fibres, plastic beads, and so on. Any of these can be risky if they get out of the plush toy. Beads are a choking hazard. The polyester fibres are like the string we already discussed. Cotton and kapok can block your pet’s digestive tract.

Stuffed toys can still be used, of course, but keep a close eye on the seams. Once the seams start to give way, replace the toy.

Pet Safety Starts with You

Keeping your pet safe is very much like keeping a baby safe. Check all new toys as if you were going to give them to a toddler. Could a piece be pulled off and swallowed? Are there any sharp, pointy bits? Does that look like lead or cadmium paint? If so, choose a different toy.

Some toys are fine for supervised play, such as those “fishing pole” cat toys. Put those in a cat-proof cupboard when you aren’t around to watch. Browse the range of dog toys and choose something that suits your dogs personality.

You’re the responsible adult in the house. It’s your job to keep the pets and children safe.

The post Choosing Soft Toys That Are Safe For Your Pet appeared first on Love That Pet.

Buying toys for your pets is like buying toys for your toddler. You need to watch for dangers in every toy, no matter how harmless it looks to ensure your pet’s safety.

Catnip and honeysuckle-stuffed plushies are among the most common and popular toys for cats, and what dog doesn’t enjoy tearing apart a stuffed squirrel or old slipper? Ferrets like to pretend to hunt down stuffed animals three times their size, and conures love to have a “lovie” to snuggle with.

All these soft toys seem harmless enough. After all, what can a plush toy do? However, even the safest-looking toy might harbour a risk to your pet’s health and safety. As a responsible pet-owner, it’s your job to make sure your pet’s toys are safe, just as you would check every toy for a small child.

Pointy Parts

Cats and ferrets like to chase soft toys that dangle on a string which, itself, dangles from a stick. The contraption looks like a fishing rod. These types of toys are great to play with when you’re there controlling the stick, but they are not good for unsupervised play as the pointy ends represent a very real risk to your pets eyes, mouth and body.

Strings

Then, there’s the string on that dangly toy. Balls of wool and toy mice with long tails also have long, stringy parts. These run the risk of strangling or choking your pet. Worse, if a string is swallowed, it can cut open your cat’s intestines. This is a medical emergency that represents a real risk your pet’s life and, should it occur, will require a visit to your nearest emergency veterinary clinic.

Tinsel and fake “icicle” drapey, like those you find on Christmas trees, are also dangerous to your pets. So is the cellophane grass that is sold to line Easter baskets.

Small Parts

Another choking risk comes in the form of small eyes and noses on soft toys. Quite often, these are glued onto the toy, and it takes very little time for Misty or Fluffy to get them off. Sometimes, these pieces are simply lost. Other times, they are swallowed or inhaled. Tiny felt bits are less likely to be an issue than the plastic pieces. The plastic can break apart, leaving sharp edges which can cut tummies.

If toys need faces, safe paints are the best bet. Sturdy embroidery is the next best choice.

Paints and Dyes

If you’ve been paying attention to the news over the past few years, you’ve probably heard about recalls of children’s toys because of lead, cadmium, cobalt, and mercury in the paints used to decorate them. This is actually a larger problem in children’s toys than it pet toys, but you still need to be watchful. If there are painted designs on a dog’s soft-rubber chew-toy, that paint is going to come off and end up in your dog. Choose an unpainted chewy.

The main issue with pet toys and paint will show up when you are shopping for parrot toys. The safest choice is to stick to food-grade dyes for any parrot toy that is painted.

Stuffing

Over the past few years, the companies that make pet toys have started offering un-stuffed plushies for dogs. As a tug-of-war toy, this is perfect. Fido can rip and tear to his heart’s content, and you don’t need to worry about him accidentally swallowing the stuffing.

Stuffing can be made of any of several substances: cotton, kapok, polyester fibres, plastic beads, and so on. Any of these can be risky if they get out of the plush toy. Beads are a choking hazard. The polyester fibres are like the string we already discussed. Cotton and kapok can block your pet’s digestive tract.

Stuffed toys can still be used, of course, but keep a close eye on the seams. Once the seams start to give way, replace the toy.

Pet Safety Starts with You

Keeping your pet safe is very much like keeping a baby safe. Check all new toys as if you were going to give them to a toddler. Could a piece be pulled off and swallowed? Are there any sharp, pointy bits? Does that look like lead or cadmium paint? If so, choose a different toy.

Some toys are fine for supervised play, such as those “fishing pole” cat toys. Put those in a cat-proof cupboard when you aren’t around to watch. Browse the range of dog toys and choose something that suits your dogs personality.

You’re the responsible adult in the house. It’s your job to keep the pets and children safe.

The post Choosing Soft Toys That Are Safe For Your Pet appeared first on Love That Pet.

Congratulations – you’re getting a new furry addition to the family!

Of course, now that you’ve decided you’re ready for the pitter patter of paws, there are lots of other decisions to be made. Most importantly, what kind of furry friend will you be looking for?

You probably know whether you want a cat or dog, and perhaps you even have a preference for male or female, but have you considered age? Getting a new furry friend doesn’t necessarily mean having to deal with crazy puppy and kitten antics (as much fun as they can be!) – there are lots of options available to adopt an adult or senior pet.

When deciding what age pet to get, its important to look at your current lifestyle and what home environment you’re bringing your new furry friend into.

1. How much time do you have? This is important to consider with younger animals as they do require more exercise, attention and training. Older animals are generally more obedient, already toilet trained, and require less time. While they may be starting to slow down a little, if you are the type who is active all day and just want to relax when you get home, maybe an older pet is for you!

2. How much patience do you have? Are you able to commit to puppy classes, prepared for cleaning up lots of accidents, and okay with possibly seeing a beloved piece of furniture/items destroyed by your hyperactive younger pet? The most common age that dogs are surrendered to pounds is between 6 months and 18 months when they are entering their challenging adolescent stage. Getting a dog who is older than this can be much less work.

3. How often are you home? Most younger pets don’t do well being kept alone by themselves. They may try to escape, bark or become destructive. Older pets are generally more settled and happy to snooze the day away until you’re back from work.

4. How active are you? Often, well-meaning family members who are worried that their (grand)parents are lonely, will buy them a puppy or kitten. What they haven’t considered is that their (grand)parent may have difficulty bending down to change that kitty litter or take their new puppy for 30 minute walks twice a day. Little pets that are running around underfoot can also be a dangerous trip hazard for older people with mobility issues. Of course, if you’re someone who likes to go running, then an active younger dog may be the perfect running companion!

5. What do you want from your pet? Are you looking for a pet to exercise with, take out to the dog park, and play with your kids for hours? Then a puppy or kitten may be the best fit. If you’re looking for a calm companion, then an older pet may be more suited.

Choosing a new furry family member is a big decision. It’s important to objectively think about your individual circumstances, and whether they’d better suit a puppy/kitten or an older pet.

The post 5 Questions to Ask Before Getting Your Next Pet appeared first on Love That Pet.

Congratulations – you’re getting a new furry addition to the family!

Of course, now that you’ve decided you’re ready for the pitter patter of paws, there are lots of other decisions to be made. Most importantly, what kind of furry friend will you be looking for?

You probably know whether you want a cat or dog, and perhaps you even have a preference for male or female, but have you considered age? Getting a new furry friend doesn’t necessarily mean having to deal with crazy puppy and kitten antics (as much fun as they can be!) – there are lots of options available to adopt an adult or senior pet.

When deciding what age pet to get, its important to look at your current lifestyle and what home environment you’re bringing your new furry friend into.

1. How much time do you have? This is important to consider with younger animals as they do require more exercise, attention and training. Older animals are generally more obedient, already toilet trained, and require less time. While they may be starting to slow down a little, if you are the type who is active all day and just want to relax when you get home, maybe an older pet is for you!

2. How much patience do you have? Are you able to commit to puppy classes, prepared for cleaning up lots of accidents, and okay with possibly seeing a beloved piece of furniture/items destroyed by your hyperactive younger pet? The most common age that dogs are surrendered to pounds is between 6 months and 18 months when they are entering their challenging adolescent stage. Getting a dog who is older than this can be much less work.

3. How often are you home? Most younger pets don’t do well being kept alone by themselves. They may try to escape, bark or become destructive. Older pets are generally more settled and happy to snooze the day away until you’re back from work.

4. How active are you? Often, well-meaning family members who are worried that their (grand)parents are lonely, will buy them a puppy or kitten. What they haven’t considered is that their (grand)parent may have difficulty bending down to change that kitty litter or take their new puppy for 30 minute walks twice a day. Little pets that are running around underfoot can also be a dangerous trip hazard for older people with mobility issues. Of course, if you’re someone who likes to go running, then an active younger dog may be the perfect running companion!

5. What do you want from your pet? Are you looking for a pet to exercise with, take out to the dog park, and play with your kids for hours? Then a puppy or kitten may be the best fit. If you’re looking for a calm companion, then an older pet may be more suited.

Choosing a new furry family member is a big decision. It’s important to objectively think about your individual circumstances, and whether they’d better suit a puppy/kitten or an older pet.

The post 5 Questions to Ask Before Getting Your Next Pet appeared first on Love That Pet.

Known as the ultimate gentleman for its dapper good looks and gentle nature the Boston Terrier makes a great apartment pet and loves kids.

Boston Terriers are categorised as a non-sporting breed and are far removed from their fighting, ratting pasts, having been bred mainly as a companion dog for many generations. Generally they are quiet dogs and love people and children, though if they are poorly socialised as puppies they can be a little nervous.

Bostons are sturdy, muscular and robust dogs and although they tend to be boisterous with boundless energy, if exercised daily can adapt to apartment living.

WHAT DOES THE BOSTON WANT IN THEIR PERFECT LIFE PARTNER/FAMILY?

I would be happy living with a family, single person or an older person. So long as I’m not left alone for long periods, as I do like human company. I am perfectly content to snuggle up on the couch and do not need constant activity and play like many other terrier breeds. I can be a little protective of my family at times, so please take care to train and socialise me as a puppy.

AT A GLANCE

Lifespan 12-14 years
Weight 5-11 kg
Height (at shoulder) 38-43 cm

 

PERSONALITY

Stubborn/strong willed – Boston Terrriers are known to be a little stubborn at times. They can be easily trained if motivated and only positive training methods are used, but they will often have a mind of their own.

Loyal – A Boston will often bond very closely to one person in the family and be extremely loyal. This can translate to a dog that is not suited to long periods of being alone and perhaps even a bit snappy if not socialized appropriately.

Affectionate – Bostons love absolutely everyone and thrive in a family where they get lots of attention. They love cuddles, brushing and play and need to be with another dog or their family rather than being left alone for long periods.

EXERCISE & TRAINING

Exercise Requirements Low – 0-0.5 hours per day
Training Requirements Low – 0-0.5 hours per day
Apartment Friendly? Yes

 

Boston Terriers are small dogs that do not require vigorous exercise, but do love to go out on excursions with the family. They should not be left alone for long periods and will bond very closely with their owners. Training requirements are minimal, so they are ideally suited to elderly owners and apartment dwellers.

GROOMING

Trips to the Groomer No- easy care at home
Tick Friendly? Yes
Hypoallergenic No
Brushing Low – Little to now brushing
Hair fall Moderate Shed- will drop some hair, but not excessive
Coat Type Short

 

FAMILY SITUATION

Good With Kids Excellent – Good with kids of any age
Good With Other Small Pets High – Good with other smaller animals
Sociability Medium – Can live alone or with others.

 

Boston Terriers are sturdy little dogs that if socialised when young are great with kids of any age. If not socialised they can be a little nervous and worried about interactions with children and other dogs. They don’t have a high prey drive, unlike other terriers, so most are safe with smaller animals such as cats so long as they are supervised.

EXPENSES

Overall Expenses (Annual) Low $1000-$1500
Veterinary Expenses (Annual) Low – $100-$300
Food Expenses (Weekly) Low – $5-$10

 

HEALTH & WELLBEING

MAJOR HEALTH CONCERNS

Tracheal collapse – many Bostons have a characteristic ‘goose honk’ cough with exercise or excitement due to the tracheal cartilages being a little weak, this can lead to increased risk of airway infections.

Dental disease – Small breed dogs often get significant dental disease, sometimes through poor diet and lack of chewing, but also simply due to genetic factors. Implementing daily brushing, diets that involve chewing and perhaps water additives can help.

Luxating patella – Bostons often have knee caps that pop in and out, sometimes with no pain, but in a relatively small number of cases they need surgical correction.

Brachycephalic Airway Disease – one of the trade-offs for that cute snub-nose is breathing difficulties, particularly with exercise. Those narrow nostrils and the long soft palate can be surgically corrected to help some dogs. Most Bostons will snore and they must avoid weight gain or exercise in hot conditions.

PREVENTATIVE CARE & WHAT TO LOOK FOR:

Keeping your Boston Terrier a healthy, lean weight will limit orthopaedic diseases and complications from luxating patellars, breathing difficulties and tracheal collapse.
Implementing some strategies such as water additives, daily brushing and chewing can help limit the risk of costly dental treatment later in life.

Avoid exercising your Boston in the heat of the day, as they can easily overheat and develop heatstroke.

Having large, protuberant eyes on the front of the head, without protection from a long nose can mean that Bostons are more prone to eye trauma. Some may even sleep with their eyes partly open, leaving them susceptible to drying. If your Boston has weepy, red eyes or is squinting, see your vet immediately for assistance.

BREED ORIGIN AND INTERESTING FACTS

The Boston Terrier is one of the few breeds that originates in the US and was the first American bred breed to be registered by the American Kennel Club.

The Boston is known as the ‘American Gentleman’. They originated from one dog owned by Robert C. Hooper, coming from a Bull Terrier lineage. The breed was very popular in Boston in 1870, which is where it got the name Boston Terrier.

Boston Terriers are popular therapy dogs in the US and Canada due to their love of people and calm temperament.

The round circle on the top of some Boston Terrier’s heads is known as the ‘kiss of God’ and is thought to represent that the dog is descended from one of the original Haggerty family dogs from the early 1900’s.

RESCUE A BOSTON TERRIER

Petfinder lists all types of dogs who need homes, both purebred and mixed breeds, adults and puppies.

The ASPCA often has Bostons for adoption, just do an advanced search on their adoption page.

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