All posts tagged: dc

Any dog guardian who truly understands their canine companion knows that these animals are the most selfless and amazing creatures. Dogs routinely put their person’s wishes above their own needs. It’s this desire to please that is best demonstrated in the sport of agility where dogs are guided through a dog obstacle course such as jumps and weave poles in a particular order within an allotted timeframe.

Dogs inherently want to please and agility training allows them to connect with their handlers at deeper level. Once a well-trained dog completes an obstacle, his/her head will turn to see where her owner is directing them next. Of course, there are many ways to bond with your dog, but the depth of communication between dog and handler in this team sport is remarkable.

New findings challenge popular views of estrogen’s role in cancer risk.

Dogs that are spayed at a young age have a reduced risk of developing mammary tumors, the canine equivalent of breast cancer. Early spaying reduces levels of estrogen production, leading many veterinarians and scientists to cast estrogen in a negative light when it comes to mammary cancer.

But the effects of estrogen on cancer risk in dogs aren’t straightforward, according to a new study led by researchers from Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine . While it’s clear that spaying dogs greatly minimizes their risk of developing mammary cancer, the findings suggest that the practice may increase the risk of more aggressive cancers. And in spayed animals with mammary tumors, the team found that higher serum estrogen levels were actually protective, associated with longer times to metastasis and improved survival times.

Help! How to do I train my dog to not whine in the car?
The Bark’s advice columnist Karen B. London answers readers’ questions about canine behavior. Got a question? Email askbark@thebark.com
Dear Bark: The local dog park is a short drive from my house, and I usually take my dog there before doing other errands. She sits right behind me in the the back seat, and within a few minutes of leaving the house, she starts whining and pacing in anticipation, which is not only distracting, it’s also irksome. Can a dog be trained out of these behaviors? What’s the best way to deal with back-seat dog whining on the way to the dog park?

It’s wonderful that you’re taking your dog somewhere that makes her so happy! Of course, her excitement about going has its downside, which is her behavior in the car on the drive there. But there are ways to help make the ride better.

Canines and humans sense quantity in similar regions of the brain

Researchers have found yet another way that humans and dogs are of one mind. This time, the subject of the similarity is how they process concepts of quantity—an important ability for many animals. Knowing roughly how many predators are approaching or how many food items are available for foraging has survival advantages. So, it is little wonder many animals have a basic sensitivity to quantity, and there is a term for it—numerosity.

To address canine numerosity, Lauren Aulet, a graduate student at Emory University working with Gregory Berns, used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study dogs’ brains while they viewed various quantities of dots. The area of the dot array was always the same, but the number of dots within it varied. The dogs in the study have been trained to sit still during the fMRI. They passively watched various groups of dots as they were flashed on a screen.

New trends in animal care

Good news! In many parts of the country, animal shelters are morphing into places that are able to do more to benefit the communities they serve. The days when abandoned companion animals were simply housed, fed and kept out of harm’s way while awaiting adoption are becoming a thing of the past, as evidenced by several developing trends.

IMPROVED EXPERIENCES.

Shelters are far more animal-centric than ever before. The best of them have evolved into community centers focused on animal welfare— vibrant places devoted to training, behavior modification, research, community interaction, educational programs and a specialized branch of veterinary medicine. Piped-in music, rotating sensory stimulation, manners training, play groups, enrichment, more comfortable bedding, more activities, better spaces: shelters are working to improve life for the animals in every way and at every stage of the experience.

Dog’s name and age: Riley, 7 years

Nicknames: RyRy, Monkey, Piggy and Honey

Adoption Story: My partner had recently lost his childhood dog and sought comfort in going to the Butte Humane Society after work to get his dog fix, giving the dogs there some love. No long after, he brought me to meet Riley and we instantly fell in love.

Riley has FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out). She wants to be present for everything mom and dad do. Riley lives a very active life and loves every second of it. She is ball-obsessed (hence the chuck-it by her feet), loves playing fetch, swimming (in any body of water she can find), dog parks, hikes and nature walks. She ends each day by relaxing at home with her two favorite people.

Dog’s name and age: Papa, 9 years

Nicknames: Papa Bear, Papa-san, Umpapa

Adoption Story: It had been 6 months since my fur companion, Sundance Kid, passed. I was cruising the NorCal Boxer Rescue adoptable dog site and Papa immediately stood out because a former (and favorite) manager’s last name is Papa. It felt like a cosmic sign that Papa was the companion for me. I support and volunteer for NCBR.org , this picture of Papa was taken while strutting for for NCBR at the annual Best Friends San Francisco SYM Fundraiser.

A rare genetic mutation could result in dogs being exposed to dangerously high levels of anesthetic agents.

If not identified before surgery, a rare genetic mutation could result in your dog being exposed to dangerously high levels of anesthetic agents.

Scientists at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine initially discovered the mutation in greyhounds and more recently in other common dog breeds.

The research group, a member of the Program in Individualized Medicine (PrIMe), published its findings last week  in Scientific Reports.

Pets Sitters in Paradise

After the family dog died of old age and their two sons started careers, Gregg and Amber Russell faced a quandary common among retirees: Should they look for a new dog and enjoy the fun and companionship dogs offer? Or should they remain pet-free so they could travel wherever and whenever they choose?

Lucky for them, they found a way to do both: as pet sitters for the well-to-do in places as various as Hawaii, southern Spain, the Caribbean islands, British Columbia, New York City and more.

The Russells don’t get paid for pet sitting, nor are they reimbursed for airfare, but they do live in style in interesting locations, usually with the use of the family car and, sometimes, maid service. “We feel like we hit the jackpot,” says Amber.

 

A black Chilean dog wearing a red bandana made his mark during the New York City subway protests beginning in November 2019.

The protests were ignited by videos documenting police assaults on black and brown youth in the subways. For example, in one, an officer punches a 15-year-old unarmed African American teenager in the face.

Stickers bearing the dog’s image jumping a turnstile appeared on subway walls and trains. They also surfaced in social media illustrations announcing his arrival in New York City.