All posts tagged: dogwalkers

During the past few weeks, as several hurricanes buffeted the southeastern United States and the Bahamas, our team has been working round the clock, bringing much-needed help and relief to animals.

After Hurricane Dorian swept through the Bahamas, claiming dozens of human lives and placing countless animal lives in jeopardy, our Humane Society International team was on the ground, moving through the rubble on Abaco Island to rescue animals and help reunite them with their families.

Stateside, our HSUS teams worked hard to coordinate the transport of 400 adoptable animals from shelters in Florida and South Carolina that were in Dorian’s path, to our shelter and rescue partners in other parts of the country.

This past week, as Tropical Storm Imelda swept through Texas, an HSUS team once again went into the field to help. On Sunday, we coordinated the out-of-state transport of more than 120 cats and dogs from a shelter in a Texas city ravaged by floods.

The animals, who have been up for adoption from Beaumont Animal Care in Beaumont, Texas, are being temporarily housed at the Humane Society of Tulsa. Soon, they’ll be transported to other shelter and rescue partners where they will have a chance to find loving homes.

These animals are safe, but we are in peak hurricane season right now, and we expect more calls for help to come our way. We’ll be ready, as always.

Through years of such work, we have developed a response strategy for both HSUS and HSI that includes swift assessment, appropriate relief and support, including deployment when needed, and long-term investments in reconstruction of animal welfare infrastructure in areas devastated by disaster.

When there is news of a severe storm approaching, we reach out immediately to shelters and agencies in the affected area. We take quick action to move animals to safety before disaster strikes, we intensify our efforts to get the word out to people with pets in the path of the storm, and we plan and prepare for helping to put the pieces back together in the aftermath.

At the international level, our HSI disaster response team came into its own in the wake of the massive Indian Ocean tsunami, which caused tremendous devastation in Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and India in 2004. In subsequent years, the HSI team deployed to Haiti, Japan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Mexico, Myanmar and China. In just the last two years, the HSI Animal Rescue Team has helped animals in crisis after floods in India, volcano eruptions in Guatemala and earthquakes in Mexico, among other natural disasters.

Stateside, in just the past year, our HSUS Animal Rescue Team was on the job wading through waist-deep waters to pull out animals trapped in floods in South Carolina in September 2018, caring for animals until they could be reunited with their families after the wildfires in California in November, and coordinating transports of animals from Alabama after the state was hit by tornadoes in March, and from Louisiana ahead of Tropical Storm Barry in July.

Earlier this month, the team helped rescue dogs and cats and other animals from an alleged cruelty situation in Kansas, and in June they rescued approximately 200 cats and dogs and approximately 150 horses from two alleged neglect situations in Texas.

We are able to maintain these strong, trained animal rescue teams, ready to deploy when disasters strike or other emergencies arise, because of the support of those who care. When our stakeholders look to us for help, it is your generosity that makes it possible for us to respond and help animals.

Please support our domestic lifesaving efforts by making a donation to our Emergency Animal Rescue Fund so we can continue to help animals in crisis. And if you want to support our international efforts, you can donate to our HSI Animal Rescue Fund .

Our Humane Society International team is in South Korea, closing down yet another dog meat farm and preparing to transport more than 90 dogs to the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada. Staff members on the ground describe this farm as smaller in size than some of the others we have closed, but no less horrible. There are rows of dogs in small, elevated wire cages with absolutely nothing to enrich their lives or give them any comfort. There is filth everywhere, underfoot and in the cages, and the dogs have no escape or respite from the smell and discomfort.

This is the 15th dog meat farm HSI has closed down since 2015, as part of a pioneering program that helps farmers transition out of this trade, which results in the brutal killing of hundreds of thousands of dogs each year. The farmer who owned this farm admitted that he has also sold puppies to dog fighters.

To date, we have transported more than 1,800 dogs, fated for the butcher’s block, out of South Korea. In time, they find their way to shelter and rescue partners in the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States, for a chance at a new life as a beloved companion.

At the dog meat farm, there are rows of dogs in small, elevated wire cages with absolutely nothing to enrich their lives or give them any comfort. There is filth everywhere. Photo by Jean Chung/For HSI

There are many incredibly sweet dogs on this farm, including Boston terriers, golden retrievers, giant Mastiff mixes and everything in between. Despite their terrible circumstances, they are showing amazing resilience. Kelly O’Meara, HSI’s vice president for companion animals and engagement, tells me that the property erupts with barking when our team arrives, and all the dogs run to the front of the cages to get noticed. Among the dogs are three mama dogs with their puppies – mother dogs usually suffer the most because they not only have to provide for themselves but also for litter after litter of puppies they are forced to have.

One of the mama dogs, Storm, is a beautiful white Jindo with five very big, healthy, chubby and bouncy puppies who are living in the cage with her. But she is dangerously thin, with all her ribs protruding. Storm also has an open wound on her lower front leg.

Despite her own troubles, Kelly says, Storm is an amazing mom who has been giving her puppies everything she can provide. It’s a pleasure to watch her with her puppies, as they jump around her, licking and biting each other and her playfully.

Among the dogs are three mama dogs with their puppies – mother dogs usually suffer the most because they not only have to provide for themselves but also for litter after litter of puppies they are forced to have. Photo by Jean Chung/For HSI

Life for Storm and her puppies will soon change dramatically for the better. She has already begun her journey to regain her health, and soon she will have an opportunity to become part of a loving family, as she so deserves.

There are an estimated two million dogs like Storm on dog meat farms in South Korea alone, and we realize that the task ahead is enormous. While we cannot close down each of these farms, we are demonstrating to the government that our successful model of transitioning dog meat farmers to humane trades can be adopted nationwide to wipe out this industry for good. And increasingly, we’re gaining the support of Korean citizens who share our strong opposition to the trade.

By turning a global spotlight on this problem, and by reaching out to Koreans about the evils of the dog meat trade, we are changing how this trade is viewed within their country. Since last year, authorities – keenly aware of growing domestic disapproval and international censure — moved to close, with the assistance of HSI/South Korea, the largest dog slaughterhouse in the country in Seongnam; and in July this year HSI/Korea worked with other Korean animal groups and the Busan city council to close the Gupo dog meat market.

Our work in Korea will continue, until we are certain that animals are not suffering anymore on dog meat farms, with nothing to look forward to other than a cruel death by electrocution or bludgeoning. And for the 90 dogs we are rescuing right now — including Chewbacca, a golden retriever at the farm who is being adopted through one of our rescue partners by HSI President Jeffrey Flocken — change will come even sooner, as they begin their transit overseas, to a future that we hope is filled with treats, walks and lots of cuddles.

Despite their terrible circumstances, the dogs are showing amazing resilience. Photo by Jean Chung/For HSI

This week, Delta Airlines announced it will discontinue its ban on emotional support animals on flights longer than eight hours. However, in a retrogressive move, the airline said it will continue to prohibit pit-bull-type dogs on its airplanes.

Delta’s decision fails to acknowledge what scientists and animal experts have now agreed upon for years – that there is no evidence supporting the assertion that a dog poses a direct threat because of his or her breed. Even the federal Department of Transportation recently issued guidance to airlines asking them to not prohibit service dogs based on their breed or physical appearance – guidance Delta appears to have completely ignored.

With advances in science and our increased understanding about a dog’s DNA and its relationship to appearance and behavior, we now know that determination of a dog’s breed is a complex issue that does not neatly translate into predictive behavior patterns. Dogs of all shapes, sizes and breeds serve as support animals. Delta is discriminating not just against the animals but also against individuals with disabilities who rely on these animals to help them perform routine daily tasks, including getting from place to place.

Airlines have discretion in how pets fly, but they should make reasonable accommodations for service and emotional support animals regardless of breed, and they also have the responsibility to make appropriate accommodations for owners with larger size animals. Most relevant for the current debate, however, is that animals should be treated as individuals, and that if airline personnel determine that an animal—service animal or otherwise— is displaying unsafe behavior or is too stressed to fly, they have the ability to recommend that such an animal not accompany their owner on the flight.

The airline is also bucking a nationwide trend where entire states, counties and localities have moved decisively in recent years to prohibit or overturn laws that discriminate against dogs who look a certain way. Right now, our staff members in Maryland are preparing to help overturn a decades-old breed-specific policy in Prince George’s County. The county is the second most populated locality in the United States, after the Miami-Dade County in Florida, that now discriminates against certain dogs based on their appearance.

If Prince George’s does repeal its ban – and we will be pushing for this with all of our might — it will join more than two dozen localities that have thrown out breed-specific legislation in just the last 18 months, including Kansas City, Kansas. Earlier this year, Washington became the 22nd state in the nation to prohibit its towns from passing breed-specific legislation.

What county lawmakers should have realized by now is that breed-specific bans are cost-prohibitive, difficult to enforce, and do nothing more than create a scary situation for some residents, while driving away others. Gerrard Sheppard, an NFL football player who was formerly with the Baltimore Ravens, says he worries that each time he even drives through Prince George’s County with his dogs Ace and Zoe, they could be taken away from him simply because of how they look. He says he cannot imagine anything happening to them – “I pour my heart into these dogs.”

Sheppard will be at a rally we are organizing in the county on October 1 to make the case for the repeal, along with our coalition partners Best Friends Animal Society, Humane Rescue Alliance, Prince George’s SPCA, and Show Your Soft Side, a public service campaign that works with young people to end animal abuse.

Joining us will also be Matthew White, a Purple Heart recipient who was wounded in Afghanistan when an IED explosion blew off his leg below the knee. White adopted Nike, his pit-bull-type dog, from the Washington Humane Society (now Humane Rescue Alliance). The two are inseparable, with the dog helping the man manage his post-traumatic stress disorder. Matthew was offered free housing in Prince George’s County through a private program that provides housing to wounded veterans, but he refused it because of his commitment to Nike. He now lives in Virginia and, alongside Sheppard, advocates to end breed discrimination as a spokesman for Show Your Soft Side.

There is no evidence that breed-specific legislation keeps communities — or airlines — safer. But what it does do is cause tremendous hardships to animals and their owners. We urge Delta CEO Ed Bastian to reconsider the airline’s decision, and our offer to implement more effective approaches to ensuring passengers and pets stay safe on planes still stands. We will also be pushing to overturn the ban in Prince George’s County. If you live in the county, please contact your council member and ask him or her to support the repeal. And if you live in a community with breed-specific legislation, download our advocacy toolkit to learn how to repeal such legislation.

The post Delta bans pit-bull-type dogs while more U.S. localities move to end breed discrimination appeared first on A Humane World .

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Nala lives in Washington, DC. Nala’s owner is Lisa May, and this dog’s walker is Mara. At Waggy Walkys we love our client’s and their owner’s. 🙂

We know we can never take your place in the loving eyes of your pet – but we sure as heck can serve as an awesome fill-in when you’re at work, too busy or away on vacation. Waggy Walkys has been catering to pets of all shapes, sizes and breeds since 2002, growing a trusted network of pet care professionals throughout the DC, Maryland and Virginia area.

It’s not just what we do that sets us apart – it’s how we do it. Your pet’s health and safety are our main priorities, with extensive training, vetting and background checks provided for all pet care professionals in our network. Most of our trusted dog walkers and pet sitters have cared for animals for much of their lives, ensuring they have the know-how and skills to properly tend to the needs of your pet.

When you entrust your pet with Waggy Walkys, you enjoy daily updates, detailed reports and, best of all, peace of mind that your pet is being cared for with the compassion, attention and adoration he deserves. Our second priority? Having tons of fun, of course! Give us a ring today.

Our services cover all kinds of stuff you and your pet would need help with, from dog walks to family-style boarding, overnight house sitting visits to daily pet sitting visits (morning, afternoon, evening) for dogs, cats and any other pets you may have! We even offer a pet taxi to transport your pet to appointments or to and from your designated dog boarding house. Need something extra special? We gladly customize our services to meet you and your pet’s exact needs. Contact us now to learn more.

Waggy Walkys LLC is a professional Dog Walking and Pet Care company that has been in business since 2002. We pride ourselves on pet safety, thoroughly screened staff, and excellent customer service. Please contact us today for our current promotions!

Photo of Bella the Saint Bernard Walked by Waggy Walkys

This amazing dog Bella lives in Washington, DC. This dog’s owner is Steven May, and This dog’s walker is Mara. At Waggy Walkys we love our client’s and their owner’s. 🙂

We know we can never take your place in the loving eyes of your pet – but we sure as heck can serve as an awesome fill-in when you’re at work, too busy or away on vacation. Waggy Walkys has been catering to pets of all shapes, sizes and breeds since 2002, growing a trusted network of pet care professionals throughout the DC, Maryland and Virginia area.

It’s not just what we do that sets us apart – it’s how we do it. Your pet’s health and safety are our main priorities, with extensive training, vetting and background checks provided for all pet care professionals in our network. Most of our trusted dog walkers and pet sitters have cared for animals for much of their lives, ensuring they have the know-how and skills to properly tend to the needs of your pet.

When you entrust your pet with Waggy Walkys, you enjoy daily updates, detailed reports and, best of all, peace of mind that your pet is being cared for with the compassion, attention and adoration he deserves. Our second priority? Having tons of fun, of course! Give us a ring today.

Our services cover all kinds of stuff you and your pet would need help with, from dog walks to family-style boarding, overnight house sitting visits to daily pet sitting visits (morning, afternoon, evening) for dogs, cats and any other pets you may have! We even offer a pet taxi to transport your pet to appointments or to and from your designated dog boarding house. Need something extra special? We gladly customize our services to meet you and your pet’s exact needs. Contact us now to learn more.

Waggy Walkys LLC is a professional Dog Walking and Pet Care company that has been in business since 2002. We pride ourselves on pet safety, thoroughly screened staff, and excellent customer service. Please contact us today for our current promotions!